By Ljubica Boshkova and student of the Master in Clinical Audiology and Hearing Therapy

Abstract

This experimental study aimed to investigate the auditory learning abilities of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) using a pitch discrimination task. Two groups of participants, Group A (8 children with ASD) and Group B (8 children with ADHD), aged between 4-6 years, were selected based on formal academic assessments and consultation with their class teacher for suitability for the study. The experiment involved a pitch discrimination task, where the participants were asked to detect differences in pitch in a complex sound sequence, and their performance was evaluated under two conditions: low stimulation (quiet) and high stimulation (noisy) settings.
The results of the study showed that the ASD group exhibited lower overall accuracy in the pitch discrimination task than the ADHD group. Additionally, the ASD group demonstrated slower learning in the task in quiet settings, but higher abilities in noisy environments, while the ADHD group showed higher learning abilities in a quiet setting but lower abilities in a noisy environment. These findings suggest that children with ADHD may benefit more from auditory learning compared to children with ASD.
This study highlights the importance of early interventions to support auditory learning in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Identifying the strengths and weaknesses in auditory processing abilities of children with ASD and ADHD can assist in developing targeted intervention programs that cater to the specific needs of these children. Providing early auditory interventions could enhance their communication and social skills, leading to improved outcomes in academic and social settings.
Future research could investigate the specific neural mechanisms underlying the differences in auditory processing between children with ASD and ADHD. Additionally, longitudinal studies could assess the long-term effects of early interventions on the auditory learning abilities of children with neurodevelopmental disorders.
This study provides important insights into the differences in auditory learning between children with ASD and ADHD. The findings suggest that children with ADHD may benefit more from auditory learning compared to children with ASD. These findings emphasize the importance of early interventions to support auditory learning in children with neurodevelopmental disorders, which could enhance their communication and social skills and lead to better outcomes in academic and social settings.

Keywords: Auditory learning, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), pitch discrimination, neurodevelopmental disorders, learning abilities, communication skills.

Download the full Research Work: Ljubica Boshkova (2023). Auditory Learning Comparison Between Children with Autism And ADHD. SAERA – School of Advanced Education, Research and Accreditation.

 

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